Match Descriptions

ISSF Matches

The International Sport Shooting Federation (ISSF) is an international body responsible for administering a number of pistol, rifle and shotgun matches shot around the world. The standardised rules and worldwide participation in these events provides a foundation for a number of these matches to be included in Olympic and Commonwealth Games events.

Air Pistol

Air Pistol is an indoor match consisting of 60 shots shot over a distance of 10m. Air Pistol is an Olympic Sport.

Standard Pistol

Standard pistol is 60 shot outdoor match shot with .22LR firearms. Semi-automatic pistols are used in this match.

Centrefire Pistol

Centrefire pistol is a 60 shot outdoor match shot in 2 x 30 shots stages. Each stage uses a different target style. The match can be shot with semi-automatic pistols or revolvers with calibres between .32 and .38.

25m Pistol

This match is officially shot by women and juniors although it is a match that is typically open to men at club and state level. The course of fire is the same as Centrefire Pistol.

50m Pistol (Free Pistol)

50m Pistol is a 60 shot outdoor match. The match is typically shot with single shot .22LR pistols with long barrels, wrap around orthopedic grips, and very low trigger weights. 50m Pistol has been an Olympic Sport.

Rapid Fire Pistol

The Rapid Fire Pistol match is a 60 shot outdoor match using .22LR semi-automatic pistols. Participants fire 1 shot onto each target in a group of 5 targets in varying times ranging from 8 seconds to 4 seconds. Rapid Fire is an Olympic Sport. 

Pistol Australia Matches

Pistol Australia (PA) is the peak sporting body for pistol shooting in Australia. It is through our association with PA that members at CLDPC have access to matches such as Service Pistol and the Internationally recognised WA1500 matches.

Service Pistol

The Service Pistol Match and it’s variants are “home grown: matches in many respects and are typically shot in Australia and New Zealand.

WA1500

The WA1500 is an abbreviation for World Association with the 1500 referring to the highest possible score. WA1500 matches are shot world wide and are also known as PPC1500 in some circles.

ISSF MATCH

Air Pistol

The Air Pistol match is a slow fire match demanding similar levels of precision to Free Pistol except that it is shot at 10 metres on a target with a 12mm Ten-ring on a target measuring 17cm X 17cm. The match consists of 60 shots.

Air pistol is a great teacher of handgun shooting fundamentals, as the highly accurate handguns, with their minimum allowable trigger weight of 500 grams are easy to control and have no recoil. They are also very economical to shoot and are noiseless compared to cartridge firearms.

There are three types of Air Pistol operating systems used on target air arms; spring and piston, pneumatic and gas powered.
The spring and piston pistols are best represented by the Feinwerkbau line. All spring and piston pistols have to have some recoil compensating system built in to the mechanism to dampen recoil.

The pneumatic air arms have a built in pump that highly compresses air into a pressure chamber, from where it is released with a trigger operated valve. These types of pistols require more cocking effort than the others.

The gas operated systems use compressed air, and are easy to operate but require a separate gas supply.

All good quality target Air Pistols have adjustable grips, sights and triggers, and are highly refined shooting machines that leave the shooter in no doubt who is at fault if scores are down. Most Air Pistol ranges are indoors, and this offers shooters the advantage of shooting of an evening and getting plenty of low cost practice.

ISSF MATCH

Standard Pistol

The Standard Pistol match is shot at 25 metres with a 0.22 Long Rifle semi-auto on a standard Precision target with a 50mm 10 ring, in timed series of five shots on turning targets.

The match consists of:-
    – 4 series, each of 150 seconds
    – 4 series each of 20 seconds and
    – 4 series each of 10 seconds
for a total of 60 shots.

Each series starts with the shooters arm at 45 degrees to the horizontal.

The handgun used in this event must have a barrel no longer than 150mm and a trigger no lighter than 1000gm.

Recoil handling characteristics are important in a Standard Pistol, especially in the 10 seconds series. The original Standard Pistol match was conceived to allow shooters to have an event to shoot with the standard sporting 0.22 semi-autos that were available. Ruger, S&W, High Standard, Browning, Pardini, Walther, Benelli and others make appropriate handguns that fit the original concept and are popular for use at club level.

Standard Pistol is a challenge to old and new shooters alike, as a momentary lapse in concentration in the faster series can see many points disappear from the score. The Standard Pistol match combines both precision and rapid fire techniques in its course of fire, and the mixture of both guarantees an interesting match.

ISSF MATCH

Centrefire Pistol

The Centre Fire match remains one of the most popular events, although it too has been around for a long time. The match consists of two separate 30 shot stages of fire.
    – One is the Precision stage shot at 25 metres on a precision target (50 mm 10 ring), with five minutes allowed for each 5 shot series.
    – The other is the Rapid Fire stage that is also shot at 25 metres, but on turning targets. One shot is fired with each exposure of the target as it turns toward the shooter for 3 seconds and away for 7 seconds, with the shooter lowering his arm to 45 degrees between each exposure of the target.

Any centre fire calibre from 0.32 to 0.38 can be used in a revolver or semi-auto, with a barrel no longer than 150mm and a trigger pull no lighter than 1000 grams. Many target grade revolvers are available for this match, mainly in 0.38 Special or 0.357 Magnum, although there are some 0.32 calibre revolvers and semi-autos available.

The heavier trigger pull specified for Centre fire requires firm control of the handgun in both the Precision and Rapid Fire stages, and this coupled with the recoil of the centre fire ammunition makes this quite a difficult event for the new shooter, although one that is universally popular.

ISSF MATCH

50m Pistol (Free Pistol)

One of the oldest matches, the Free Pistol match consists of shooting sixty shots at precision targets, offhand at 50 metres. The 10 ring is 50 mm in diameter.

The handguns normally used are long barrelled 0.22 Long Rifle single shots that are exceptionally accurate, and have full wrap around orthopaedic grips, very light set triggers and high precision sights.

Scoring well in this match is very difficult if the shooter has not mastered the elements of accurate hand gunning.

Almost all clubs have Free Pistol facilities. While presenting the new shooter with a formidable challenge, Free Pistol shooting is an excellent way of learning how to shoot handguns, as there is no time pressure to hurry through the match.

ISSF MATCH

25m Pistol

These matches are identical to the Centrefire match except that the handguns are 0.22 Long Rifle & semi-autos that comply with the Standard Pistol specifications. Some manufacturers make special lightweight versions of their Standard Pistols for these matches, among them Walther and Feinwerkbau.

The match is officially designated for women and Juniors however at club and state level the match is also shot by men.

ISSF MATCH

Rapid Fire Pistol

In 25m Rapid Fire Pistol competitors use semi-automatic pistols in .22 calibre (5.6mm) at all levels of competition up to and including the Olympics.   A series (or string) consists of five (5) shots fired, one at each of five target within a limited time.

Five targets stand next to each other at a 25m distance from the shooter. When the targets appear, the competitor must raise his/her arm from a 45 degree angle and fire his/her five shots. If a shot is too late, it will score as a miss.

Distance: 25 metres
Calibre: .22 long rifle rimfire
Number of shots/time: 60 competition shots, fired as two stages of 30 shots.

There are three different time limits: 8 seconds, 6 seconds and 4 seconds for the series. A stage consists of two series in each time, and a full course of fire comprises two such stages.

In Australia this event is also shot by men and  women at most competitions.

PISTOL AUSTRALIA MATCH

Service Pistol, Service Pistol Unrestricted, & Service Pistol 25

The Service Pistol event for 9mm and ·38/·357 pistols consists of 90 shots fired at distances varying from 50 yards to 7 yards with the pistol holstered at the commencement of each series. Shooters must hold a current PA Holster Accreditation to compete or train in this event. PA Service Pistol targets are used for this event and set in a bank of four targets per shooter. 

The match includes aspects designed to simulate the real world experiences of Service personnel in police and military environments. Participants shoot from a range of positions including prone, sitting, kneeling, from behind barricades and free standing. The match requires that ammunition have a minimum power factor of 120 which results in a recoil that more closely mirrors real life ammunition used by service members.


Service Pistol Unrestricted is the same course of fire as Service Pistol with shooters starting each stage from the ready position instead of from the holster. The Unrestricted match also removes maximum weight limits on firearms and removed the load power factor requirements thus enabling this match to be shot with a wider variety of ammunition and firearms.

Service Pistol 25 is a 65 shot match shot over distances ranging from 25 yards to 7 yards. It is shot using shorter barrel firearms, typically 4″ Revolvers. Semi-automatic pistols used for ISSF Centrefire matches can usually be used for this match as well. The Service 25 match used the ISSF Rapid Fire Target.

PISTOL AUSTRALIA MATCH

WA1500

The WA1500 Match events all start from the holster. A current PA holster accreditation is mandatory for all shooters participating in these events.

As the Australian body affiliated to the World Association Precision Pistol Competition 1500, PA provides an international ‘career pathway’ for our Service Pistol shooters. Commencing in 2007 PA has sent teams to World Championships every year.

The WA1500 Match events are very similar to our PA Service Pistol events as these, and a number of other Service Pistol type matches around the world, share common ancestry.


The main WA1500 match consists of 150 rounds, shot over distances ranging from 7 yards to 50 yards. Similarly to Service Pistol, participants shoot from a variety of positions including prone, kneeling, sitting, from behind a barricade and free standing although the order of shooting is different.  WA1500 shooters use a single target only which is changed at varying times throughout the match with scoring occurring after the match is concluded.


There are a number of variants of the WA1500 match which have different rules and restrictions on guns and ammunition. The 60 shot match is a subset of the full 150 shot match and is also shot over distances of 7 yards to 50 yards. The 48 shot match is shot with shorter barrel firearms such as 4″ revolvers. This match is conducted over distances ranging from 3 yards to 25 yards.


All matches require ammunition to meet a minimum power factor and are shot from the holster.